Rusty Russian military trucks at an abandoned warehouse

Rusty Russian military trucks at an abandoned warehouse ABANDONED SPACES
Photos of Rusty Russian military trucks at an abandoned warehouse. abandoned storage base for military equipment, where we found various military vehicles before recycling, awaiting their inevitable fate.
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy

Today I would like to tell you about one abandoned storage base for military equipment, where we found various military vehicles before recycling, awaiting their inevitable fate.

Walking a few years ago through one industrial zone, our eyes were attracted by a rickety fence with a trodden path leading to the fallen fence span at the rear exit from some territory. The past Soviet era has left behind a huge military-technical legacy accumulated over the years of the arms race, which can be found almost everywhere in the CIS countries.

Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy

But time is inexorably running forward and much of what was needed yesterday is becoming obsolete morally and physically, turning out to be unclaimed in modern realities, and a colossal amount of old military equipment is still awaiting disposal at old bases and every year is gradually being scrapped.

The same fate befell these military vehicles, which we accidentally stumbled upon several years ago, having found their last days of “life”, after which the equipment was disposed of. Engines, headlights and other spare parts were removed from many trucks. Although outwardly some ZILs trucks looked more or less intact, they were also faulty. In addition to the ZIL-131 vehicles, several GAZ-66 “Shishiga” vehicles were also abandoned here.

Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy

The USSR quality mark proudly flaunts on the doors. Various trailers stood nearby, among which there were field kitchens, compressors, and something else. Finally, let’s take a look at a couple of broken and crumbling warehouses, some of which already had holes in their roofs with fallen slabs.

On one of them, the attention was drawn to the inscription “Peace for Peace 1970”, laid out of bricks. Looking into one of the broken warehouses, we saw broken trailers, all rusty scrap metal, but incomprehensible structures piled up in a heap. Scattered on the floor were buckets, basins, soldier’s enamel mugs, thermoses, and Tyumen scales that could be found in any grocery store in the 1990s. It is sad, of course, to see how old equipment is dying, but there is no special sense in giving a “second life” to such time-worn trucks.

Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy
Photo: zen.yandex.ru/dv_destroy

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gregoryhooqe
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