Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House ABANDONED SPACES
Abandoned Pekhra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House is located in a picturesque corner near the Vladimir road (now the Volga highway) on the left bank of the shallow Pekhorka, a tributary of the Moskva River.
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

Architects K. I. Blank, F. P. Kazie, A. A. Menelas took part in the creation of the architectural and artistic ensemble of the 18th century.

Pekhra-Yakovlevskoe (formerly the village of Yakovlevo) is located in a picturesque corner near the Vladimir road (now the Volga highway) on the left bank of the shallow Pekhorka, a tributary of the Moskva River. According to local historians, since 1591 the village became the estate of the Golitsyn princes, who owned it for more than two hundred years, thanks to which the small village became one of the outstanding architectural and park complexes of its time. The first of the Golitsyns, the owner of the estate, was the boyar Andrei Ivanovich Golitsyn.

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

At the time when the owner of Yakovlevsky was Pyotr Mikhailovich Golitsyn (1682-1722), a small estate was built in the village and a garden was laid out. Since Pyotr Mikhailovich had no heirs, after his death the estate went to his younger brother – Mikhail Mikhailovich Golitsyn (known to historians as “junior” or “lesser”), one of its most famous owners.

The son of M. M. Golitsyn, Lieutenant-General Pyotr Mikhailovich Golitsyn, is known to local historians as one of the main builders of the estate and the temple under her. In the 1860s, he built a wooden house with two wings on the estate and expanded the park. In the year of his death in a duel in 1775, his son Mikhail was 11 years old. Therefore, custody of the new owner of Pehra-Yakovlevsky was taken by his uncle Alexander Mikhailovich Golitsyn (1723-1807), vice-chancellor and chief chamberlain of the imperial court. He continued the renovation of the estate, with him a patrimonial church was built – the Church of the Transfiguration of the Lord (1782). The architectural design of the temple is original in that its rotunda consists of two bell towers. This is very rare in the Moscow region. Built presumably by the son of Matvey Kazakov. Currently, the church has a Sunday school, a library, and an Orthodox society “In the name of the royal martyrs.”

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

Further, the renovation of Pekhra-Yakovlevsky was continued by Mikhail Petrovich Golitsyn (1764-1848), during which the architectural and park complex of the estate was finally formed. The estate was damaged by the French invasion of 1812, but was quickly rebuilt.

The estate and the church were visited by some of the Imperial persons: in 1817 Empress Maria Feodorovna and Elizaveta Alekseevna visited here, and in 1826 – Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna. The way the estate looked at that time makes it clear the picture of J. E. Svebach’s “Walk in the Park”.

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

In 1828-1832, Prince Ivan Alekseevich Gagarin became the owner of Pekhra-Yakovlevsky. From 1832 to 1835, Pekhra-Yakovlevskoye belonged to A.D. Naryshkina, who later sold the estate to Peter Ivanovich Shelashnikov (about 1787-1846). In many works, Boris Aleksandrovich Lobanov-Rostovsky is mentioned as the person to whom the “real chamberlain” Anna Dmitrievna Naryshkina sold her estate, but this is denied by sources.

Before the 1917 revolution, Pekhra-Yakovlevskoe belonged to the Roop family. The last owner was the general and dignitary Christopher Khristoforovich Roop. At the end of the 19th century, the buildings of the Pekhra-Yakovlevskoye estate were redeveloped, as a result of which their volumetric composition was disturbed. By the beginning of the 20th century, five textile factories were built in Balashikha around Pehra-Yakovlevsky. This led to a significant increase in the population density near the estate.

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

Since 1871, Pekhra-Yakovlevsky was the headquarters of the Pekhor volost of the Moscow district, which arose after the abolition of serfdom and the reforms of Alexander II. After the revolution, from the summer of 1917, the civilian commissar of the Provisional Government was housed in the estate.

In 1924 the main building was badly burned out. “The burnt house, with the grass growing on its cornices, is now nothing more than a picturesque ruin in the spirit of Hubert Robert’s paintings,” A. Gretsch stated with regret. Subsequently, the manor house was restored as a three-storey one, without taking into account the previous layout and external art forms. From 1929-1930 higher educational institutions are located in Pehra-Yakovlevsky. Now the main building houses the Correspondence Agrarian University, which rebuilt the building several times. Only the paired wings remained unchanged, which are connected to the house by galleries of paired colonnades of the laconic Tuscan order. On the backside of the house, overlooking the park, there is a staircase decorated with sculptures of lions and sphinks.

Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House
Abandoned Pehra-Yakovlevskoe Manor House

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